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Don’t wait for a doctor’s appointment, go straight to your pharmacy.

Pharmacies in Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven offer a service called Pharmacy First that gives you more choice and easier access when you need health advice and treatment.

Pharmacy first

Your local pharmacy can give you advice and, if needed, medicines for common illnesses, so you don’t have to make an appointment with your GP.

Your pharmacist is a qualified health care professional who can help with your health problems.  The pharmacist may offer you a private space to talk to you about your symptoms.

If you don’t normally pay for your prescriptions, then any medicines prescribed by your pharmacist will be free.

If you do pay for your prescriptions, then the cost of the medicines should be less that the prescription charge and you get advice from your pharmacist.

Just ask your pharmacist about Pharmacy First.

The following conditions are currently covered by the Pharmacy First scheme:

Frequently asked questions (FAQs):

Find local services

A - Z of health conditions

NHS Data

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How do I know if I can use the Pharmacy First scheme?

The Pharmacy First scheme is available to anyone registered with a GP practice in Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven. A list of practices is available here.

What about children?

Children can be treated for certain conditions depending on their age and what medicines are available. Some medicines can only be given to younger children on prescription.  Sometimes the pharmacist will need to see your child to make sure the right advice or treatment is given.

How do I know which pharmacy to go to?

All pharmacies involved in the scheme are listed below. They will display a Pharmacy First sticker in their window.

Addingham

Clayfields Chemist 151b Main Street, Addingham, Ilkley, LS29 0LZ

Burley in Wharfedale

Cohen’s Chemist 123 Main Street, Burley-in-Wharfedale, Ilkley, LS29 7JN

Carleton In Craven

Carleton In Craven Pharmacy Old Cobblers Cottage, West Road, Carleton In Craven, Skipton, BD23 3DT

Crosshills

Crosshills Pharmacy Crosshills Group Practice, Holme Lane, Crosshills, Keighley, BD20 7LG
Your Local Boots Pharmacy 12 Main Street, Crosshills, Keighley, BD20 8TB

Gargrave

Naylors Ltd 36 High Street, Gargrave, Skipton, BD23 3RB

Grassington

Your Local Boots Pharmacy 9 Station Road, Grassington, BD23 5LS

Haworth

J S Langhorne Ltd 23 Mill Hey, Haworth, Keighley, BD22 8NQ

Ikley

Ilkley Moor Pharmacy 10 Cowpasture Road, Ilkley, LS29 8SR
Lloyds Pharmacy Springs Lane Medical Centre, Springs Lane, Ilkley, LS29 8TH

Ingleton

Ingleton Pharmacy Bank View, 37 Main Street, LA6 3EH

Keighley

Aireworth Chemist 3 Aireworth Road, Keighley, BD21 4DH
Boots 22-28 Queensway, Keighley, BD21 3PY
Hussain Dispensing Chemist 141 North Street, Keighley, BD21 3AU
Keighley Health Centre Pharmacy Oakworth Road, Keighley,BD21 1SA
Olive Late Night Pharmacy 7 Broomhill Avenue, Keighley, BD21 1ND
Olive Late Night Pharmacy 50 Highfield Lane, Keighley, BD21 2EH
Rowlands Pharmacy St Andrew’s Surgeries, West Lane, Keighley, BD21 2LD
Sainsbury’s In Store Pharmacy Cavendish Street, Keighley, BD21 3RU
Superdrug Pharmacy 35-39 Low Street, Keighley, BD21 3PP
Sykes Chemists 191 Long Lee Lane, Long Lee, Keighley, BD21 4UX
The Co-operative Pharmacy 47 Scott Street, Keighley, BD21 2JH
Your Local Boots Pharmacy 48 Ashbourne Road, Ingrow, Keighley, BD21 1LA

Menston

Menston Pharmacy 88 Main Street, Menston, Ilkley, LS29 6HY

Oakworth

J S Langhorne Ltd 99 Commercial Buildings, Lidgett, Oakworth, Keighley, BD22 7HN

Oxenhope

Oxenhope Pharmacy 36 Station Road, Oxenhope, BD22 9JJ

Settle

Your Local Boots Pharmacy 36 Market Place, Settle, BD24 9ED

Silsden

HBS Pharmacy Silsden Health Centre, Elliott Street, Silsden, BD20 0DG
Rowlands Pharmacy 49 Kirkgate, Silsden, Keighley, BD20 0AQ
Rowlands Pharmacy 76 Kirkgate, Silsden, Keighley, BD20 0PA

Skipton

Boots The Medical Centre, Coach Street, Skipton, BD23 1LQ
Lloyds Pharmacy 93 Caroline Square, Skipton, BD23 1DA
Lloyds Pharmacy 36 Newmarket Street, Skipton, BD23 2JB

Steeton

Steeton Pharmacy The Health Centre, Chapel Road, Steeton, Keighley, BD20 6NU

Sutton-in-Craven

Sutton in Craven Pharmacy 47 Main Street, Sutton-in-Craven, Keighley, BD20 7HX

What conditions are included in the scheme?

The following conditions are currently covered by the scheme:

  • Athlete’s foot
  • Blocked nose
  • Cold
  • Cough
  • Earache
  • Fever (high temperature)
  • Hay fever
  • Sore throat
  • Teething
  • Threadworms
  • Thrush
  • Strains and sprains

Will I always get medicine?

Not always, because medicines are not always the best way to treat a health problem. If this is the case, the pharmacist will give you advice on how to treat your symptoms.

Can my pharmacist refer me to my GP?

If the pharmacist thinks you need to see your doctor or nurse urgently, the pharmacist will refer you to your GP.  They will tell your doctor or nurse that you have been to the pharmacy and the reason you have been referred to them. If it is not urgent, the pharmacist will advise you to make an appointment to see your GP.

What should I do if my symptoms don’t go away?

If your symptoms don’t go away, you should seek further advice from your pharmacist or GP.  Remember to take any medication you may have been taking with you.

Find local services

A - Z of health conditions

NHS Data

Interview with a pharmacist

With the launch of the Pharmacy First scheme in Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven, we have asked pharmacist Simon Lee Tapping from Boots, Ingrow, to tell us a bit about the scheme and about day to day life as a pharmacist.

Pharmacy First is a new service from your local pharmacy. The pharmacist can give you advice and, if needed, medicines for common illnesses, so you don’t have to make an appointment with your GP.

Name: Simon Lee Tapping

Work at: Boots, Ingrow at 48 Ashbourne Rd, Keighley BD21 1LA

Comments on the Pharmacy First service

I’m really pleased to be able to offer my local community the new Pharmacy First service.

Pharmacies are perfectly placed on the high street to offer healthcare advice and support to all members of the public with no need to book an appointment. Many of the issues raised to GPs can be dealt with in the community pharmacy setting, easing the pressure on GPs and an already over stretched NHS hospital system.

The Pharmacy First service uses the skills and knowledge of pharmacists to help patients’ better look after themselves, easing the pressure placed on GP surgeries and local hospitals. By thinking “Pharmacy First” patients can go straight to their pharmacy to get the help and advice they need for common ailments, without making a doctor’s appointment.

How did you become a pharmacist?

I decided upon a career in pharmacy after completing a work placement in the local pharmacy in the town where I grew up. I saw that the pharmacist worked closely with patients and customers, giving help and advice about their health and their medication.  This was something I wanted to be able to do.

After completing A levels in maths, chemistry and biology, I completed my four year course at Aston University, Birmingham. After graduating with my Masters Degree, I did my pre-registration year (a year under the supervision of a pharmacy tutor) within Blackpool Victoria Hospital. After five years of studying to be a pharmacist, I passed my pre-registration exam, which enabled me to register as a pharmacist.

Since qualifying as a pharmacist, I have worked both as a hospital and a community pharmacist.  I have been a pharmacist for Boots for the past six years.

What qualifications do pharmacists have?

It takes five years to become a pharmacist. You study for four years at university to get your masters degree in pharmacy (MPharm). Then you have to work for at least a year under the supervision of an experienced and registered pharmacist. Every pharmacist in the NHS has to be registered with the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) and you must pass an exam to be allowed to register.

As well as dispensing medication, what other work do you do?

We do a lot of other work as well as dispensing medication. We offer advice and can recommend over the counter medicines for common problems such as coughs, colds, aches and pains. We can also help you decide whether you need to see a doctor. Under the Pharmacy First scheme, if you need treatment as well as advice, we can supply some medications, so you don’t have to go to your GP. If you don’t pay for your prescriptions, this medication will be free. Patients will also be offered some written advice to take away with them.

We give advice to people about health-related issues, such as stopping smoking, managing your weight and sexual health. Some community pharmacies do testing for blood pressure, cholesterol or chlamydia. Many pharmacies will offer medicines reviews. This is where we talk though with our patients how they’ve been getting on with their medication and if they’ve been having any problems, we can offer advice or recommend they see their GP if needed.

What type of illnesses and issues can a pharmacist help me with?

We can give advice and if needed, treatment, for a range of common problems like athlete’s foot, coughs, colds, hay fever, thrush and strains and sprains. We can help with common health issues in babies and children, such as earache, fever, teething and threadworms and will know when a visit to the GP is needed.

Do I need an appointment to see a pharmacist?

No, you can pop in and see us whenever you need to. You can find the opening hours of your pharmacy on the NHS Choices website.

What do you like best about being a pharmacist?

I like the teamwork involved, we have a goal and that is to ensure our customers get what they need and the best advice to go with it.  There is nothing better than having a patient thank me and my team for the advice and support we have given.  It may be simply supporting a patient through a difficult diagnosis or discussing their medicines so that the patient better understands what their medicines are for and how best to take them.  It’s great when patients come back to me with further questions about their medicines and ailments – it is the sign that I am in the profession where I belong.

Leaflets: 

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Coughs

Cough (acute)

A cough is a reflex action to clear your airways of mucus and irritants such as dust or smoke.  Coughs may be dry or chesty. The cough is often worse at night. Coughing does not damage the lungs. Most coughs clear up within three weeks and treatment isn’t usually needed.

What causes a cough?

Most people with a short-term cough have a respiratory tract infection caused by a virus. This includes upper respiratory tract infections, such as a cold, flu, laryngitis, sinusitis or whooping cough, or lower respiratory tract infections, such as acute bronchitis and pneumonia (although this is rare). Coughs can occasionally be caused by non-infectious causes like asthma.

How should I treat my cough?

There’s no quick way of getting rid of a cough caused by a viral infection. It will usually clear up after your immune system has fought off the virus.  The simplest and cheapest way to soothe a short-term cough may be a warm drink containing honey and lemon.

What about cough medicines?

Clinical trials have not found that cough medicines are any better than a placebo or dummy treatment. As cough medicines don’t make the cough get better any quicker, they are not provided as part of the Pharmacy First service.

Why do pharmacies sell cough medicines if they don’t work?

Although there is no good evidence that cough medicines make the cough get better any quicker, some people feel that they help their symptoms. As cough medicines are considered to be safe for the vast majority of adults and for children over six years old, cough medicines can be bought from pharmacies for patients to soothe their cough.

Children and babies with coughs

Over-the-counter cough and cold medicines shouldn’t be given to children under the age of six. There’s a potential risk of these medicines causing unpleasant side effects in children, such as allergic reactions, sleep problems or hallucinations (seeing and hearing things that aren’t real). Instead, give your child plenty to drink and if your child is over one, consider a warm drink of lemon and honey. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are not classed as cough and cold medicines and can still be given to children.

When should you (or your child) go back to your GP practice or contact NHS 111?

See your GP if you’ve had a cough for more than three weeks or if your cough is progressively getting worse.  If you experience breathing difficulties, chest pain or you cough up blood, seek medical help immediately.

Quitting smoking

Within three to nine months of stopping smoking, you will no longer have a cough or wheeze and your breathing will have improved.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics are not used to treat coughs because they kill bacteria, not viruses. Unless you develop a secondary bacterial infection, such as pneumonia, antibiotics will not usually be advised.

Further information can be found on the NHS Choices website.

Coughs (easy read)

Cough (acute)

 Man coughing What is a cough? A cough is your body’s way of clearing your airways of mucus, dust or smoke. Coughs don’t usually need treatment. Coughs can be worse at night.  Coughing does not damage your lungs.
 A woman coughing What causes a cough? Most people with a short-term cough have a virus. Coughs can sometimes be caused by non-infectious causes like asthma. If you smoke, it will help with your cough and breathing if you stop.
 A woman drinking How should I treat my cough? Have a warm drink with honey and lemon in it. Cough medicines won’t make your cough get better any quicker, so they are not provided as part of the Pharmacy First service.
 Children playing Children and babies with a cough Don’t give over-the-counter cough and cold medicines to children under the age of 6. Give your child lots of drinks. If they are over the age of one, you could give them a warm drink of lemon and honey.You can give paracetamol and ibuprofen to children, if needed, for fever and pain.
 A GP and patient When should you (or your child) go back to your GP practice or contact NHS 111? See your GP if your cough lasts or more than three weeks or keeps getting worse. If you are finding hard to breathe, have chest pain or you cough up blood, see a doctor or a nurse straight away.
 Antibiotics Antibiotics Coughs and colds are caused by viruses. Antibiotics kill bacteria, not viruses, so they won’t cure your cough. If you get an infection caused by bacteria, like pneumonia, you may be given antibiotics if you need them.

 

More information can be found on the NHS Choices website

Get better without using antibiotics

How should I treat my cold?

  • the best way to treat most colds, coughs or sore throats is to drink plenty of fluids and to rest.
  • colds can last about two weeks and may end with a cough and bringing up phlegm.
  • over the counter remedies, like paracetamol, can ease symptoms. Ask your pharmacist for advice.
  • if the cold lasts more than three weeks, or you become breathless or have chest pains, or already have a chest complaint, see your doctor.

What about my children, they’re always getting coughs and colds?

It’s very common for children to get coughs and colds. Ask your pharmacist for advice. If the symptoms persist and you are concerned, see your doctor but don’t expect antibiotics.

Why should antibiotics not be used to treat coughs and colds?

All colds and most coughs and sore throats are caused by viruses. Antibiotics do not work against infections caused by viruses. Viral infections are more common than bacterial infections.

How long will my illness last?

Illness Lasts on average
Ear infection 4 days
Sore throat 1 week
Common cold 1 ½ weeks
Sinusitis 2 ½ weeks
Cough or bronchitis 3 weeks

When should you (or your child) go to your GP practice or contact NHS 111?

These are listed in order of urgency, with the most urgent symptoms first.

1. If you develop a severe headache and are sick.

2. If your skin is very cold or has a strange colour, or you develop an unusual rash.

3. If you feel confused or have slurred speech or are very drowsy.

4. If you have difficulty breathing. Signs that suggest breathing problems can include:

  • breathing quickly;
  • turning blue around the lips and the skin below the mouth; and
    • skin between or above the ribs getting sucked or pulled in with every breath.

5. If you develop chest pain.

6. If you have difficulty swallowing or are drooling.

7. If you cough up blood.

8. If hearing problems develop or if there is fluid coming out of your ears.

Key facts about antibiotics

  • antibiotics are medicines used to treat infections caused by bacteria.
  • colds and most coughs are caused by viruses not bacteria, so antibiotics will not help.
  • if you take antibiotics when you don’t need them, they may lose their ability to kill bacteria.
  • antibiotics can upset your body’s natural balance of bacteria, resulting in diarrhoea and thrush.
  • some antibiotics can cause allergic reactions such as rashes, being sick if you also drink alcohol and reactions to sunlight – and other symptoms.

Further information can be found on the NHS Choices website

Get better without using antibiotics (easy read)

Woman drinking waterHow should I treat my cold?

Drink plenty of fluids and rest.

Medicines that you can buy over the counter, like paracetamol, can help. Ask your pharmacist for advice.

If your cold lasts more than three weeks, see your doctor.


Children playing
Why are my children always getting coughs and colds?

It’s very common for children to get coughs and colds. Ask your pharmacist for advice.

If the cough or cold doesn’t get better and you are concerned, see your doctor.

You shouldn’t expect to get antibiotics.


AntibioticsWhy shouldn’t antibiotics be used to treat coughs and colds?

All colds and most coughs and sore throats are caused by viruses.

Antibiotics do not work against infections caused by viruses.

Viral infections are more common than bacterial infections.


A woman coughingHow long will my illness last?

  • An ear infection usually lasts 4 days.
  • A sore throat can take 1 week to get better.
  • A cold can take 1½ weeks to get better.
  • A cough can take 3 weeks to get better.

A GP and patientWhen should you go to your GP practice or contact NHS 111?

  1. If you have a very bad headache and are sick.
  2. If your skin is very cold or a strange colour or you get a rash.
  3. If you feel confused or very sleepy or you slur when you talk.
  4. If you find it hard to breathe
  5. If you have chest pain.
  6. If you find it hard to swallow or are drooling.
  7. If you cough up blood.
  8. If you can’t hear or fluid is coming out of your ears.

Further information can be found at www.nhs.uk/antibiotics

Pharmacies offering the Pharmacy First scheme

The pharmacies below are part of the Pharmacy First scheme. Look for the Pharmacy First sign in the window or simply ask your pharmacy. To check out their opening times visit www.nhs.uk

Addingham

Clayfields Chemist 151b Main Street, Addingham, Ilkley, LS29 0LZ

Burley in Wharfedale

Cohen’s Chemist 123 Main Street, Burley-in-Wharfedale, Ilkley, LS29 7JN

Carleton In Craven

Carleton In Craven Pharmacy Old Cobblers Cottage, West Road, Carleton In Craven, Skipton, BD23 3DT

Crosshills

Crosshills Pharmacy Crosshills Group Practice, Holme Lane, Crosshills, Keighley, BD20 7LG
Your Local Boots Pharmacy 12 Main Street, Crosshills, Keighley, BD20 8TB

Gargrave

Naylors Ltd 36 High Street, Gargrave, Skipton, BD23 3RB

Grassington

Your Local Boots Pharmacy 9 Station Road, Grassington, BD23 5LS

Haworth

J S Langhorne Ltd 23 Mill Hey, Haworth, Keighley, BD22 8NQ

Ilkley

Ilkley Moor Pharmacy 10 Cowpasture Road, Ilkley, LS29 8SR
Lloyds Pharmacy Springs Lane Medical Centre, Springs Lane, Ilkley, LS29 8TH

Ingleton

Ingleton Pharmacy Bank View, 37 Main Street, LA6 3EH

Keighley

Aireworth Chemist 3 Aireworth Road, Keighley, BD21 4DH
Boots 22-28 Queensway, Keighley, BD21 3PY
Hussain Dispensing Chemist 141 North Street, Keighley, BD21 3AU
Keighley Health Centre Pharmacy Oakworth Road, Keighley,BD21 1SA
Olive Late Night Pharmacy 7 Broomhill Avenue, Keighley, BD21 1ND
Olive Late Night Pharmacy 50 Highfield Lane, Keighley, BD21 2EH
Rowlands Pharmacy St Andrew’s Surgeries, West Lane, Keighley, BD21 2LD
Sainsbury’s In Store Pharmacy Cavendish Street, Keighley, BD21 3RU
Superdrug Pharmacy 35-39 Low Street, Keighley, BD21 3PP
Sykes Chemists 191 Long Lee Lane, Long Lee, Keighley, BD21 4UX
The Co-operative Pharmacy 47 Scott Street, Keighley, BD21 2JH
Your Local Boots Pharmacy 48 Ashbourne Road, Ingrow, Keighley, BD21 1LA

Menston

Menston Pharmacy 88 Main Street, Menston, Ilkley, LS29 6HY

Oakworth

J S Langhorne Ltd 99 Commercial Buildings, Lidgett, Oakworth, Keighley, BD22 7HN

Oxenhope

Oxenhope Pharmacy 36 Station Road, Oxenhope, BD22 9JJ

Settle

Your Local Boots Pharmacy 36 Market Place, Settle, BD24 9ED

Silsden

HBS Pharmacy Silsden Health Centre, Elliott Street, Silsden, BD20 0DG
Rowlands Pharmacy 49 Kirkgate, Silsden, Keighley, BD20 0AQ
Rowlands Pharmacy 76 Kirkgate, Silsden, Keighley, BD20 0PA

Skipton

Boots The Medical Centre, Coach Street, Skipton, BD23 1LQ
Lloyds Pharmacy 93 Caroline Square, Skipton, BD23 1DA
Lloyds Pharmacy 36 Newmarket Street, Skipton, BD23 2JB

Steeton

Steeton Pharmacy The Health Centre, Chapel Road, Steeton, Keighley, BD20 6NU

Sutton-in-Craven

Sutton in Craven Pharmacy 47 Main Street, Sutton-in-Craven, Keighley, BD20 7HX